A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

The Tyber now no gentle Gallus sees,
But smiling Thames enjoys his No-----bys.
And gentle Isis claims the Ivy Crown,

To bind th' immortal Brows of A-----son. 220

As tuneful C-----greve trys his rural Strains,
Pan quits the Woods, the list'ning Fawns the Plains;
And Philomel, in Notes like his, complains.

And Britain, since Pausanias was writ,

Knows Spartan Virtue, and Athenian Wit. 225

When St-----ny paints the Godlike Acts of Kings,
Or, what Apollo dictates, P-----r sings:
The Banks of Rhine a pleas'd Attention show,
And Silver Sequana forgets to flow.

Such just Examples carefully read o're, 230
Slide without falling, without straining soar.
Oft tho' your Stroaks surprize, you shou'd not choose,
A Theme so mighty for a Virgin Muse.
Long did Appelles his Fam'd Piece decline,
His Alexander was his last Design. 235

'Tis M-----gue's rich Vein alone must prove,
None but a Phidias shou'd attempt a Jove.

The Fury said; and vanishing from Sight,
Cry'd out to Arms; so left the Realms of Light.

The Combatants to th' Enterprize consent, 240
And the next day smil'd on the great Event.


JOHN POMFRET
(1667-1699-1702)

The Choice1

IF HEAV'N the Grateful Liberty wou'd give,
That I might Chuse my Method how to Live,
And all those Hours, propitious Fate should lend,
In blissful Ease, and Satisfaction spend:

Near some fair Town, I'd have a private Seat, 5
Built Uniform, not Little, nor too Great:
Better, if on a Rising Ground it stood;
Fields on this side, on that a Neighbouring Wood.
It shou'd within no other Things contain,

____________________
1
Published in 1700. Text of Miscellany Poems, 1702, with some changes in
punctuation.

-299-

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