A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

Nor can the parted Body know,
Nor wants the Soul, these Forms of Woe:
As Men who long in Prison dwell,

With Lamps that glimmer round the Cell, 80
When e'er their suffering Years are run,
Spring forth to greet the glitt'ring Sun:
Such Joy, tho' far transcending Sense,
Have pious Souls at parting hence.
On Earth, and in the Body plac't, 85
A few, and evil Years, they wast:
But when their Chains are cast aside,
See the glad Scene unfolding wide,
Clap the glad Wing and tow'r away,
And mingle with the Blaze of Day. 90
.


ALLAN RAMSAY
(1685?-1712-1758)

The Young Laird and Edinburgh Katy1

Now wat ye wha I met Yestreen
Coming down the Street, my Jo,
My Mistress in her Tartan Screen,
Fow bonny, braw and sweet, my Jo.

My Dear, quoth I, Thanks to the Night, 5
That never wisht a Lover ill,
Since ye're out of your Mither's Sight,
Let's take a Wauk up to the Hill.

O KATY wiltu gang wi' me, 10
And leave the dinsome Town a while,
The Blossom's sprouting frae the Tree,
And a' the Summer's gawn to smile;
The Mavis, Nightingale and Lark,
The bleeting Lambs and whistling Hynd,
In ilka Dale, Green, Shaw and Park, 15
Will nourish Health, and glad ye'r Mind.

Soon as the clear Goodman of Day
Bends his Morning Draught of Dew,

We'll gae to some Burnside and play, 20
And gather Flowers to busk ye'r Brow.
We'll pou the Dazies on the Green,

____________________
1
Published in Scots Songs, 1720. Text of Poems, third edition, 1723.

-530-

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