A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

Unwieldy man! with belly monstrous round,

For ever fed with watery supply; 670
For still he drank, and yet he still was dry.
And here a moping mystery did sit,
Mother of spleen, in robes of various dye,
Who vexed was full oft with ugly fit;
And some her frantic deem'd, and some her deem'd a wit. 675


LXXVI.

A lady proud she was, of ancient blood,
Yet oft her fear her pride made crouchen low:
She felt, or fancy'd in her fluttering mood,
All the diseases which the 'spitals know,

And sought all physick which the shops bestow, 680
And still new leaches and new drugs would try,
Her humour ever wavering to and fro;
For sometimes she would laugh, and sometimes cry,
Then sudden waxed wroth, and all she knew not why.


LXXVII.

Fast by her side a listless maiden pin'd, 685
With aching head, and squeamish heart-burnings;
Pale, bloated, cold, she seem'd to hate mankind,
Yet loved in secret all forbidden things.
And here the Tertian shakes his chilling wings;
The sleepless Gout here counts the crowing cocks, 690
A wolf now gnaws him, now a serpent stings;
Whilst Apoplexy cramm'd intemperance knocks
Down to the ground at once, as butcher felleth ox.


DAVID MALLET
(1705-1720-1765)

William and Margaret1

'TWAS at the silent, solemn hour,
When night and morning meet;
In glided MARGARET'S grimly ghost,
And stood at WILLIAM'S feet.

____________________
1
Published in the Plain Dealer, July 24, 1724. Text of Works, 1759.

-645-

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