A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

PHILIP DORMER STANHOPE, EARL OF CHESTERFIELD
(1694-1733-1773)

Verses Written in a Lady's Sherlock "Upon Death"1

MISTAKEN fair, lay Sherlock by,
His doctrine is deceiving;
For, whilst he teaches us to die,
He cheats us of our living.

To die's a lesson we shall know 5
Too soon, without a master;
Then let us only study now
How we may live the faster.

To live's to love; to bless, be bless'd

With mutual inclination; 10
Share then my ardour in your breast,
And kindly meet my passion.

But if thus bless'd I may not live,
And pity you deny,

To me, at least, your Sherlock give, 15

'Tis I must learn to die.


Advice to a Lady in Autumn2

ASSES milk, half a pint, take at seven, or before;
Then sleep for an hour or two, and no more.
At nine stretch your arms, and oh! think when alone,
There's no pleasure in bed.--MARY, bring me my gown:

Slip on that ere you rise; let your caution be such, 5
Keep all cold from your breast, there's already too much.

Your pinners set right, your twitcher ty'd on,
Your prayers at an end, and your breakfast quite done;

____________________
1
Published in The Gentleman's Magazine, May, 1733. Text of first edition.
2
Published in Dodsley Collection of Poems, 1748. Text of fourth edition, 1755, Volume I.

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