A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

Retire to some author, improving and gay,
And with sense like your own, set your mind for the day. 10

At twelve you may walk, for at this time o' the year,
The sun, like your wit, is as mild as 'tis clear:
But mark in the meadows the ruin of time;
Take the hint, and let life be improv'd in its prime.

Return not in haste, nor of dressing take heed; 15 For beauty like yours, no assistance can need.

With an appetite, thus, down to dinner you sit,
Where the chief of the feast is the flow of your wit:
Let this be indulg'd, and let laughter go round;
As it pleases your mind, to your health 'twill redound. 20

After dinner two glasses at least, I approve;
Name the first to the king, and the last to your love:
Thus cheerful with wisdom, with innocence gay,
And calm with your joys gently glide thro' the day.

The dews of the evening most carefully shun; 25 Those tears of the sky for the loss of the sun.

Then in chat, or at play, with a dance, or a song,
Let the night, like the day, pass with pleasure along.

All cares, but of love, banish far from your mind; And those you may end, when you please to be kind. 30


ANONYMOUS

The Vicar of Bray1

IN GOOD King Charles's golden days,
When Loyalty no harm meant;
A Furious High-Church Man I was,
And so I gain'd Preferment.
Unto my Flock I daily Preach'd,5 Kings are by God appointed,
And Damn'd are those who dare resist,
Or touch the Lord's Anointed.
And this is Law, I will maintain
Unto my Dying Day, Sir, 10 That whatsoever King shall Reign,
I will be Vicar of Bray, Sir!

When Royal James possest the Crown, And Popery grew in fashion;

____________________
1
Published in The British Musical Miscellany, Volume I, 1734. Text of first edition. See Preface.

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