A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

Thou, only thou, canst please thy Lover's Eyes,
Thy Voice alone can sooth his troubled Mind.

Oh that thy Charms were only fair to me, 5
Displease all Others, and secure my Rest,
No need of Envy,--let me happy be,
I little care that Others know me blest.

With thee in gloomy Deserts let me dwell,

Where never human Footstep mark'd the Ground; 10
Thou, Light of Life, all Darkness canst expel,
And seem a World with Solitude around.

I say too much--my heedless Words restore,
My Tongue undoes me in this loving Hour,

Thou know'st thy Strength, and thence insulting more, 15
Will make me feel the Weight of all thy Power:

Whate'er I feel, thy Slave I will remain,
Nor fly the Burthen I am form'd to bear,
In Chains I'll sit me down at VENUS' Fane,

She knows my Wrongs, and will regard my Pray'r. 20


THOMAS GRAY
(1716-1742-1771)

Ode on the Spring1

LO! WHERE the rosy-bosom'd Hours,
Fair VENUS' train appear,
Disclose the long-expecting flowers,
And wake the purple year!

The Attic warbler pours her throat, 5
Responsive to the cuckow's note,
The untaught harmony of spring:
While whisp'ring pleasure as they fly,
Cool Zephyrs thro' the clear blue sky
Their gather'd fragrance fling. 10

Where'er the oak's thick branches stretch A broader browner shade;

____________________
1
Written in June, 1742. Published in Dodsley Collection of Poems, 1748. Text of Poems, 1768.

-756-

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