Roman Catholicism and the American Way of Life

By Thomas T. McAvoy | Go to book overview

RT. REV. MSGR. EDWARD E. SWANSTROM*


4V. The Newer Catholic Immigration

One of the factors which goes a long way to explain significant aspects of Catholicism in America is that the Church as a whole is a product of the newer immigration -- at least compared with the predominantly Protestant and Puritan strain which informed our early American culture. There were, of course, Catholic settlements in Maryland, Florida, Texas, Arizona and California from very early days, but these groups did not seem to enter the main stream of American civilization as it exists of itself and as the world views it.

I have been asked to discuss the newer Catholic immigration, and I therefore assume that I am to deal with the migration movement that has occurred since World War II. It is precisely this newest Catholic migration movement with which I have been associated since the formation, in 1943, of Catholic Relief Services - N.C.W.C. as the agency of American Catholics for relief abroad and for the resettlement of foreign refugees.

First of all, a word on the dimensions of the newer Catholic immigration is in order. During the past twenty-five years, roughly, the period since World War II, I would estimate that about 2,000,000 immigrants have arrived in the United States under the regular quotas or through special legislation. Our annual quota is 163,000 but since it is heavily weighted in favor of Northwest Europeans, only about 90,000 visas are used each year. The various emergency laws allowed about 700,000 more to come in. I would estimate that about 43 per

____________________
*
Msgr. Edward E. Swanstrom has a diploma from the New York School of Social Work, 1933, and Doctorate of Philosophy from Fordham University, 1938. He was the Assistant Director of the Catholic Relief Services of the N.C.W.C. from 1943 to 1947 and has been the Director since 1947. He is the author of Waterfront Labor Problems ( 1938), and Pilgrims of the Night ( 1950).

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Roman Catholicism and the American Way of Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.