North Korea in Transition

By Chong-Sik Lee; Se-Hee Yoo | Go to book overview

Foreword

ROBERT A. SCALAPINO

What an extraordinary set of changes has taken place in the world at large, and most especially in the old Leninist societies, since our conferences began in 1981! At that time, economic reforms in the Communist societies were scarcely under way. In the political realm, Leninist leaders were battling to hold the line against pluralism. Consequently, the world was still essentially bipolar, with a marked cleavage between open and closed societies, granting the existence of a number of developing states that occupied positions between the outer political perimeters. Notwithstanding the relative solidarity of Leninism in structural- ideological terms, cleavages among and between Communist states were much in evidence. The Sino-Soviet split had not been mended despite faint signs that both parties hoped to reduce tension. A limited war between China and Vietnam had only recently ended. Relations between a Soviet-aligned Mongolia and China were decidedly cool. And North Korea, as usual, kept its own counsel.

In all probability, the decade of the 1990s will bring even greater changes than those we are now witnessing since we are in the very vortex of a global revolution. To predict the precise nature of events is impossible. Indeed, the intellectual arena is strewn with the bones of those who attempted to tell us where a given society -- or group of societies -- was headed. Of one thing we can be reasonably certain: Change will not follow a lineal course. However one may define such terms, "advance" will be followed at some point by retrenchment or "retreat," pursued in the name of correcting the excesses or unresolved problems bequeathed by the previous surge. In this environment, it is the task of intellectuals to live with complexity. They must not be swept away by either the euphoria or the deep foreboding of any given moment. The effort must be to assess and weigh a number of variables, some compatible, some

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
North Korea in Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 157

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.