English Life and Leisure: A Social Study

By B. Seebohm Rowntree; G. R. Lavers | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
DANCING

THERE are 450 halls in the United Kingdom used exclusively for ballroom dancing, which takes place in them on each weekday, and sometimes on Sundays also. Admission to these halls on weekdays is open to anyone on payment of a small fee, usually between 1s. 6d. and 2s. 6d. On Sundays admission is restricted to persons who, by virtue of the payment of a small annual subscription, have formed themselves into a Club for the purpose, since the admission on Sundays of the public as opposed to club members would infringe the law. In an article entitled "Britain Off Duty",1 Mark Abrams estimates that some 3,000,000 persons are admitted each week to the 450 halls. Naturally there is no means of knowing how many separate individuals make up the total of admissions, nor indeed does Mark Abrams claim that the total of 3,000,000 is an even approximately exact figure. It does, however, indicate the importance of dancing as a means of spending leisure.

This becomes even more apparent when it is added that the halls used exclusively for dancing, although the most important places where dances regularly take place, are supplemented by a very much larger number of places used for the purpose only occasionally. These include the ballrooms of hotels and restaurants, assembly halls of the kind that exist in most towns and that can be hired for an evening, and publicly owned buildings such as town hails and village halls, as well as in the recreation rooms of many factories.

All these halls, whether used regularly or occasionally for dancing, have to be licensed for the purpose by the local authorities if the general public are admitted.

____________________
1
Published in The World Off Duty, an anthology compiled by Contact Publications Ltd.

-279-

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English Life and Leisure: A Social Study
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II- Commercialized Gambling 122
  • Chapter IV- Smoking 199
  • Chapter V- Sexual Promiscuity 203
  • Chapter VI- How Honest is Britain? 218
  • Chapter VII- The Cinema 228
  • Chapter VIII- The Stage 257
  • Chapter IX- Broadcasting 267
  • Chapter X- Dancing 279
  • Chapter XII- Adult Education 315
  • Chapter XIII- Religion 339
  • Chapter XIV- Leisure Time Activities in High Wycombe 375
  • Chapter XV- Leisure Time Pursuits in the Scandinavian Countries 415
  • Appendix I 465
  • Appendix II 469
  • Appendix III 472
  • Index 473
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