A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY OF SCOTTISH WORDS AND EXPRESSIONS
THIS glossary includes all the words or phrases in the selections from Ramsay, Fergusson, and Burns which might be expected to trouble readers not familiar with the dialects in which those poets worked.
Aboon, above
Abread, abroad
Agley, amiss
Aiblins, perhaps, possibly
Airts, points of the compass
Asklent, aslant
Auld Reikie, Edinburgh
Aumos dish, alms-dish
Ava, at all
Badrins, cats
Bairan, laying bare, stripping (of earth)
Bangs, overcomes
Bannock, thick, round cake
Bassie, an old horse
Bauckie-bird, bat
Bauks, strips, ridges
Baws'nt, streaked with white
Beet, kindle or mend the fire
Beld, bald
Belyve, by and by
Ben, inwards, inside, within
Benmost, farthest in, innermost
Bent, open field
Bicker, wooden dish
Bield, shelter
Bienly, comfortably
Big, build
Birkie, lively smart youth
Birn, burden, load
Blastet, worthless
Blate, shy
Bleez, blaze, get angry
Blellum, idle, talking fellow
Bleth'ran, talking nonsense
Boddle, copper coin of the value of one-sixth of an English penny; hence anything of trifling value
Boortries, elder-trees
Bore, hole, chink
Borrows-town, royal borough
Bousing, drinking
Bowie, milk pail
Brattle, sudden start
Brent, high and unwrinkled
Broachie, small brooch
Brock, badger
Browster wife, ale-wife
Brulzies, fights or disturbances
Buirdly, stalwart, good-looking
Bumman, humming
Busk, adorn, dress, deck
But, without
Butt an' ben, in both outer and inner rooms
Byke, swarm, crowd
Byre, cowhouse
Cadger pownie, huckster's pony
Cadgie, gay
Caff, chaff
Caldrife, chilly
Callet, prostitute
Callor, fresh
Canny, cozy, comfortable
Cantie, contented
Cantrip, magic spell
Canty, pleasant
Capernoity, bad-tempered
Carlin, old woman
Cavie, hen-coop
Chiel, fellow, person
Chiep, cheep, sound
Cleek, clutch
Cod, pillow
Coft, bought
Coof, fool or simpleton
Coost, cast, tossed
Cosh, neat, snug, comfortable
Cour, lower, let sink
Couter, coulter
Couth, social
Crack, conversation, gossip
Crackan, talking
Craigie, throat
Crambo-jingle, doggerel rime
Cranreuch, hoar-frost
Creeshie, greasy
Crouse, cheerful
Cruizy, oil lamp

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