The Government of France

By Jean Blondel; E. Godfrey Drexel Jr. | Go to book overview

I: The French Republican Tradition

INTRODUCTION

A perceptive son of France once remarked that throughout history his motherland has been obliged to live dangerously. This observer saw France's perilous history as the consequence of exposed geographic position. Others have claimed that the French people lived dangerously because their Celtic origins compelled them to combativeness; still others have ascribed France's adventurous life history to an inquiring and even aspiring national mentality, which some Frenchmen turned to individual genius in art, literature, and philosophy, while others were building both the most brilliant and the least exalted political traditions. Whatever the true causes, we are here concerned with a people whose relationship to life is as dramatic as their history has been, a people who have employed the same sense of daring in choosing their art forms, their fashions, and their cuisine as they have in building empires, in experimenting with almost every known form of political system, and in fighting innumerable wars and revolutions. It is no paradox, then, that some Frenchmen may have carried their disdain for the norms of middle class life, at any rate in the past, to a point of trembling danger.

France has often been described as a woman. The French people themselves have frequently chosen female figures to symbolize their country, suggesting in so doing the infinite variety they find in their homeland and the range of emotions which it induces in them. Indeed, the Frenchman sees in France all the qualities of feminity--the softness of her country side, the passion of her people, the pettiness of her national jealousies, the capacity to endure suffering under indignities, even the splendid mixture of beauty and ugliness of her older cities. They may love or scorn France, but because she is a woman they cannot ignore her. In fact, the absorption of the French people with France is the hallmark of their political life.

When a Frenchman speaks passionately of France he may be identifying himself with a moment in her history of which he particularly approves (or which he abhors) or he may be expressing admiration (or despair) at the whole kaleidoscope of French history, accomplishments, and failures. In his mind the motherland has lived not only dangerously but vividly; it has produced heroes and villains, though heroes and villains may not be the same for different men. Napoleon or Robespierre, Richelieu or

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Government of France
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • EDITOR'S FOREWORD v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - The French Republican Tradition 1
  • Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Background of the Social Order 11
  • 3 - The Constitution 27
  • 4 - The Executive 41
  • Conclusion 54
  • 5 - The Legislature 56
  • Conclusion 76
  • 6: Political Parties 79
  • 7 - The Administration, the Judiciary, and Local Government 116
  • Conclusion 135
  • 8 - Government, Groups, and Social and Economic Policy 137
  • Conclusion 158
  • 9 - From Union to Community and Beyond 160
  • 10 - Foreign Policy 174
  • II - Problems of the Future 188
  • The French Constitution 194
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 217
  • Index 220
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.