The Canadian General Election of 1957

By John Meisel | Go to book overview

6
THE CANDIDATES

Nomination

IT IS NOW GENERALLY HELD that the characteristics and qualities of particular candidates have only a minor effect on the outcome of an election in any given constituency. In the long run, however, the picture the public has of a party is probably influenced by the sort of candidates it nominates to represent it in successive elections. The party image must, in some measure, reflect the party's personnel. It is, therefore, of interest to examine some of the personal attributes of the candidates and to look at their political experience. In 1957 did the characteristics of the Conservative politicians support the often-heard allegation that their party was more representative of high finance than the Liberal party and that generally it has been more concerned with the preservation of privilege? Did the Liberal candidates confirm the widespread belief that their party was more hospitable to non-Protestant and non- Anglo-Saxon members of Canadian society? Before these and similar questions are considered, however, it will be well to comment briefly on the way in which candidates were selected by the major parties in the 1957 election.

There are several ways in which this is done. In the absence of thorough studies of the various methods in use, only a general impression of the most common procedures can be given. No evidence is available indicating how often a particular form of selection was applied in the 1957 election or which, of the several methods followed, was employed most frequently. On the whole, it is the provincial executive of each party which has the final responsibility for seeing that each constituency party picks a suitable candidate. As a rule, the local party

-120-

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The Canadian General Election of 1957
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • List of Tables xiii
  • Part I - The Pre-Election Period Before The Election 1
  • 1 - Before the Election 3
  • 2 - The "Diefenbaker Revolution" 18
  • Part II - The Campaign 35
  • 3 - The Points At Issue 37
  • 4 - National Headquarters 63
  • In The Constituencies 83
  • 6 - The Candidates 120
  • 8 - The Campaigns Compared 165
  • 9- The Campaigns Assessed 178
  • 10 - The C.C.F. And Social Credit Parties 198
  • Part III - The Results 233
  • 11- The Election And Its Outcome 235
  • 12 - The Results Examined 246
  • 13 - Conclusion 267
  • Appendices 279
  • Index 303
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