Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)

By David Alec Wilson | Go to book overview

X
WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR (1849)

WHEN Duffy mentioned Savage Landor, Carlyle said:1--"Landor is a man of real capacity for literary work of some sort, but he has fallen into an extravagant method of stating his opinions, which makes any serious acceptance of them altogether impossible. If he encountered anywhere an honest man doing his duty, he announced that here was a phenomenal mortal, a new and authentic emanation of the Deity. This was a sort of talk to which silence was to be preferred. Landor had not come to discern the actual relation of things in this world; very far from it. But there was something honourable and elevated, too, in his views. He was sincere and altogether persuaded for the time that the wild fancies he paraded were verities. But the personal impression he left, on those who (met) him, was that of a wild creature with fierce eyes and boisterous attitudes, uttering prodigious exaggerations on every topic that turned up, followed by a guffaw of laughter that was not exhilarating; rather otherwise, indeed."

Duffy said,--"He dropped his paragons as abruptly as he took them up," and illustrated this by the instances of Bolivar and Sir Thomas Wilson, about whom he quoted what John Forster had just been telling him of Landor's present opinions.

"Yes," replied Carlyle. "That was his method. He was not inflexible in his opinions, but in his determination to be right, which was the more manful and honourable method."

Then Duffy discussing Landor's "Imaginary Conversations" urged that they 'had the dramatic form without the dramatic spirit,' and quoted many instances. Carlyle admitted he was right,--"the 'Conversations' are all more or less Landor," and tho superior in width of interest,

____________________
1

Conversations with Carlyle, by Sir C. Gavan Duffy, pp. 64-7.

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.