Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)

By David Alec Wilson | Go to book overview

XVII
RINTOUL AND CAPTAIN STERLING (1849)

DUFFY'S mention of "the greatest journalist in England" may have suggested what Carlyle said next, after a pause.1--"Among newspaper men, Rintoul, a Scotch printer who owns the Spectator, is a man of deeper insight than any of them--a man altogether free from romantic or visionary babblement or the ordinary echoes of parliamentary palaver. He was the first man in England who openly declared his complete disbelief in Reform and the Whigs, and now it is everywhere seen that his opinions are sound. He writes the literary papers in his journal. There is nothing very deep in them, but neither are they ever mere wind. He speculates on literature in a very natural manner. But he believes in nothing, and has but a poor barren theory of life, one may perceive. (Yet) he is essentially a diligent and upright man, and he turns out a newspaper which, on the whole, is the best article of that kind to be found anywhere in England just now." This was the same Rintoul who founded the Dundee Advertiser and then the Spectator, and made a success of both.

What was said of his disbelief in the Whigs recalled the similar change in the Times, and Duffy asked about Sterling, commonly called the "Thunderer of the Times." He was told what can be read in Chapter V of John Sterling, and Carlyle now added:--"It was rumoured up and down, in the trivial talk of London, that the Times was paid for this change, but that was altogether a mistake. Sterling had acted on his knowledge and convictions, and they soon came to be the convictions of his employers. Since his death, people missed his writings considerably, which is by no means wonderful when one considers the despicable makeshifts and inane trivialities which form the bulk of what is called newspaper literature."

____________________
1

Conversations with Carlyle, by Sir C. Gavan Duffy, pp. 84-8.

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.