Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)

By David Alec Wilson | Go to book overview

XXXV
BALLINA AND SLIGO (1849)

ARRIVING at Ballina on the Sunday, 29.7.49, Carlyle was conducted to the workhouses by an Inspector, ' Captain Hamilton, an Ulster man; big cheeks and black bead-eyes; Calvinist-philanthropist; a really good, but also (a) really stupid man.'1 At one of the workhouses a discharged soldier who had been drilling the boys begged for something of the nature of "shoes." '"There is Cobden, you see!" said poor bead-eyed Hamilton (to Carlyle); "discharged that man, and now he comes upon us!" Kindness à la Exeter Hall; this, with strict Calvinism for life-theory, is Hamilton's style.'

At his own house in the evening Captain Hamilton appeared a 'good and hospitable man'; but he started to 'convince me of philanthropy,' wrote Carlyle, tho in fact CaptainHamilton may have been merely making the natural mistake of supposing him already convinced. Captain Hamilton could see for himself Carlyle's sympathy with the suffering and famished people, and is not likely to have known anything else about him except, vaguely, that he had written about the French Revolution and vindicated Cromwell, and on Wednesday next was to be the guest of Lord George Hill, the foremost of good Protestant "improvers" in Ireland. If Hamilton had looked at any of Carlyle's writings on hearing he was coming, it would be at the Cromwell, for Cromwell was, even more than King William, the hero of Protestant Ireland, and of people like Captain Hamilton.

Whatever he began saying to Carlyle, he soon was horror- struck at the responses he was receiving, and privately enquired of Duffy, who appeared at least a Christian tho a Catholic,--"Is Mr. Carlyle an Atheist or what?" "No, not that, but neither Calvinist nor Catholic," was the only

____________________
1
Reminiscences of My Irish Journey, by T. Carlyle, pp. 209-24.

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.