Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)

By David Alec Wilson | Go to book overview

II
THE NIGGER QUESTION (1849)

THE "Negro Question" was what this preliminary pamphlet was called in Fraser ( December, 1849) ; but in reprinting it Carlyle changed Negro into "Nigger,"-- which was his only reply to the vituperation it received. John Mill was one of those that wrote to contradict it, saying in private,--"Carlyle turned against all his friends." Moncure Conway1 has explained that Mill, etc., had supposed Carlyle believed in democracy as they did, and were simply mistaken about him. Even the like of Crabb Robinson, who should have known better, was writing to Mrs. Austin:2--"Carlyle has been led by vanity to degrade himself more than any man of our age by the public defence of Slavery as an institution."--"By vanity," quoth he,--revealing the kind of motive that might have influenced--Crabb Robinson.

Far from defending slavery "as an institution," Carlyle was holding the mirror up to nature for the most part, and said plainly that the 'buying of Black war-captives in Africa, and bringing them over to the sugar islands for sale again,' was 'a contradiction of the Laws of this Universe,' which we should 'heartily pray Heaven to end,' and also 'help Heaven to end it wherever the opportunity is given.' But tho he expressly said he did not wish to see the men emancipated made slaves again, still he did not join the chorus of English writers and speakers glorifying themselves as better than Americans, because a few years ago the English Parliament had paid twenty millions to slaveholders in the West Indies, and stopped slavery.

There were few men better acquainted than he with the result of that expensive performance. Besides the papers and books that were open to everybody, he had heard a

____________________
1
Autobiography of Moncure D. Conway, II, p. 103.
2
Three Generations of Englishwomen, by Mrs. Ross, I, p. 239, correcting Nov. to Dec.

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.