Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)

By David Alec Wilson | Go to book overview

XVI
THE NEW DOWNING STREET (1850)

THE fourth Pamphlet was on The New Downing Street, our Government Offices as they should be. It began by roundly cursing the stupidity of 'Governments in all European countries,' in a way that went to the hearts of journalists, whatever their paymasters made them say.1 He was a "bonnie curser,"--it was a treat to read him. It was in the manner of Euclid laying down the Postulates that he wrote:--'Intellect has to govern in this world; and will do it, if not in alliance with so-called "Governments" of red tape and routine, then in divine hostility to such, and sometimes alas in diabolic hostility to such; and in the end, as sure as Heaven is higher than Downing Street, and the Laws of Nature are tougher than red tape, with entire victory over them. If there is one thinking man among the Politicians of England '--what an if!--'I consider these things extremely well worth his attention just now.'

Then he explained how in the Middle Ages the old Catholic Church opened a career to 'the noble soul in the lowest stratum of social thraldom,' so that 'the poor neatherd's son, if he were a Noble of Nature, might rise to Priesthood, to High-priesthood, to the top of this world, to be the Papa of Christendom, and Commander of all Kings'; whereby 'the old Christian society continued healthy, vital, and was strong and heroic.' The thing most needed to make Europe happy now was some method of doing likewise under modern conditions.

'Universal-suffrage Parliaments' were of no use. The men they lifted up to be Premiers and Statesmen were wretched, ugly "Greeks of the Lower Empire," meaning the worst rogues in Europe. ' Dame Dubarry's petticoat,' said he, naming a mistress of Louis XV, 'was a better seine-net for fishing out Premiers' than a universal-suffrage Parliament. 'In England alone of European Countries the

____________________
1
Told D. A. W. by surviving veterans in the nineties.

-258-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.