Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)

By David Alec Wilson | Go to book overview

VII
THOMAS WOOLNER & CO. (1851)

A YOUNG man then frequenting the house was Thomas Woolner.1 Coventry Patmore had lately persuaded Carlyle to spare tour sittings of a couple of hours each for a medallion by this promising young sculptor, who was about to go to the gold-diggings in Australia, as he could not get at home the work he wanted to do. He hoped the medallion would bring him work, and so it did by and by. Meanwhile, when seeing John Sterling through the press, Carlyle was paying Woolner for a facsimile of the medallion, which he sent to his sister in Dumfries, telling her: 'It really seems to me, and to some surer judges, a rather clever thing,--as certainly to the little sculptor himself: a very good young fellow, who we hope will come into notice yet.'

One evening this summer Woolner brought to the house a big bumptious fellow, William Bell Scott, the forty-year- old son of a respectable Edinburgh engraver known to Carlyle, and himself now a drawing-master at Newcastle by trade, and artist and poet by choice. Ten years ago this Scott had written an impudent letter to Carlyle, rebuking him for omitting to glorify the business of artists in his lectures on Heroes. There was no answer. When Carlyle Cromwell appeared, he published More Letters of Oliver Cromwell, in mockery of the history, but to the end of his life was left guessing whether Carlyle knew of the existence of his satire. What makes him worth mention is what Carlyle did when Mr. Scott's brother David died,--a far better man and artist,--and a book canvasser in London was falsely saying that a set of illustrations to the Pilgrim's Progress was sold "for the private benefit of the artist's mother."

' Carlyle subscribed,' Scott tells us,2 'but having some misgiving, wrote me at once, saying if this was the truth, "then undoubtedly some effort should be made by such as recognise your brother's genius." Altho, as I explained at

____________________
1
Thomas Woolner, by Amy Woolner, pp. 11, 12, 65.
2
Autobiographical Notes of the Life of William Bell Scott, Vol. I pp. 268-9, etc.

-341-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.