Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)

By David Alec Wilson | Go to book overview

XXII
AT BERLIN (1852)

HE was only nine days at Berlin,--the whole tour did not last seven weeks. Yet he learned so much in so little time that one is reminded of the miracle of the loaves and fishes; and in this instance the method of genius was simple common sense intensified. He concentrated on what he was doing. Thus he went to a Museum where Frederick's clothes were kept. The Keeper was more than polite. He insisted on showing the visitor everything in the place. Carlyle declined to look, explaining what he wanted. 'It was as if one should go into an inn to take a chop, and they insisted he must eat everything in their store.' The Keeper contended this and that; but at last the visitor was allowed to look at the 'military old clothes' he had come to see. He looked at nothing else, and departed feeling he had really no business even with these.1

From Berlin he sent David Masson a testimonial Masson wanted, as to his fitness for teaching English Literature in University College, London, an employment Masson duly got this year.

Meanwhile the Berliners were ready to lionize Carlyle as much as he would let them, which delighted Neuberg, who wrote to his sister:--'We have been invited to a great many dinner-parties, &c., whereby I have become acquainted with all sorts of local authorities. Everywhere, for earnestness and power, Carlyle forms a striking contrast to most of the people whom we meet.' By Sunday, 3.10.52, he had already seen 'Potsdam, Sans Souci, &c.' He remarked to Neuberg,--"We lead a pretty fast life here."--It was doubtless for Neuberg's sake that Carlyle endured the festivities, for on 5.10.52 Neuberg confided to his sister that if he then came home, Carlyle would not remain a day longer.2

____________________
1
Thomas Carlyle, by Moncure D. Conway, pp. 63-4.
2

Many of Neuberg's letters are in Macmillan's Magazine, August, 1884. Other authorities for what follows are: Varnhagen von Ense's report,

-440-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Carlyle at His Zenith (1848-53)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.