The Loyalists in the American Revolution

By Claude Halstead Van Tyne | Go to book overview
INDEX.
ACTION, freedom of, denied the Loyalist, 203, 204, 205, 207, 208, 209, 210
Adams, John, 2; his theory of the Loyalist party, 3; his opinion of "committees of correspondence," 62; fear of unsettled conditions, 92; supports independence, 100, 101; anecdote of, 202; favors compensating Loyalists, 287; on reasons for toleration, 297
Adams, Samuel, 2, 7; his addresses, 8, 14, 15; his opinion of the Regulating Act, 22; bold measures of, 34; arrest ordered, 45; his belief in independence, 93, 94
"Addressers," (see addresses); names published, 33; persecuted, 40, 41; asked to recant, 46
"Addresses," by the Loyalists, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 96, 128, 245, 246
Aid rendered by the Tories to the British (see Services), 126, 127
Allegiance, oath of, Washington demands, 129; effect of, 130; phraseology of, 130, 131; persons obliged to take, 132, 133; as a privelege,133; place where taken, 134; administered by whom, 135; penalties of refusal, 136, 239, 240; attempts to enforce, 137, 138, failure of, 139; evasion of, 139, 140, 301; demanded by both British and Patriots, 141; result of refusal, 192; Whig objections to, 219, non-jurors not allowed to buy confiscated properties, 279
Allen, James, 142, 208, 217
Amory, Jonathan, 20
Amusements of the Tories in exile, 56,264, 265, 266, 267
Anglo-mania, 42, 49, 104
Aristocracy of the Loyalists, 4, 5, 25, 26, 33, 87, 91, 92, 280
Army, Patriot, Tory epithet for, 103, 105, 161; ridiculed, 157; accusation of, 157-8; the soldiers of, sell accoutrements, 162; Tory militia greater than, 172; Arnold's proclamation to, 188; not to be discountenanced, 200; starving, 206; aids in seizing the dangerous Tories, 223
Arnold, Benedict, 188; Whigs did not distinguish, from other Tories, 190
Ashe, "Colonel", 79
Association, beginning of, by the Loyalists, 27, 55; ; resolved upon by the Continental Congress, 69; opposed by the Tories, 70, 71, 72; counter, by the Loyalists, 73; of Tories, combated by Whigs, 74; Whig more successful than the Tories in, 74; Tories protest against in Georgia, 75; in arms, 75; in North Carolina, 76; phrase-

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