The United States in the Supreme War Council: American War Aims and Inter-Allied Strategy, 1917-1918

By David F. Trask | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
The Pre-Armistice Negotiations

THE First World War was a limited war. The contending powers never completely dismissed the possibility of a negotiated peace. The impassable gulf which divided the warring coalitions during World War II did not develop during the earlier conflict. When in October 1918 the Ger- man leaders realized that victory had slipped from their grasp, they turned to diplomacy in order to salvage as much as possible from defeat. The Allied leaders proved willing to treat for peace if clear-cut guarantees were obtained to. insure against a resumption of hostilities.

In relative terms, the United States and Great Britain did not differ fundamentally in their conceptions of the peace settlement, although distinctive areas of disagree- ment on territorial settlements existed. Together they con- stituted a restraining influence on the vengeful French and the grasping Italians. Britain, however, had signed a series of "secret treaties" with other Entente Powers which im- posed distinct limitations on her diplomacy, and British imperialism in Africa and Asia created Anglo-American tensions. President Wilson's strenuous efforts to maintain diplomatic independence enabled the United States to discuss the peace settlement with both the Central Powers and the Entente Powers unencumbered by imperial com- mitments of a territorial nature or by binding treaties with other nations.

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United States in the Supreme War Council: American War Aims and Inter-Allied Strategy, 1917-1918
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.