Capital, the Communist Manifesto and Other Writings

By Karl Marx; Max Eastman | Go to book overview

banks constitute at the same time the instruments par excellence for impelling the capitalist system of production beyond its own natural limits; and become powerful means for producing crises and promoting fraud.

There is, finally, no doubt that credit will serve as a powerful lever during the transition from capitalist production to the system of production by social labour; but only as an element taken in conjunction with other radical transformations of the mode of production itself. On the other hand, the fallacies regarding the miraculous socialising influence of credit and banks are due to complete ignorance of the laws of capitalist production, and of the credit system which is one of the forms of that mode of production.


CHAPTER XXIV
CRISES

Editor's Introductory Note: Marx's theory of crises is so important for a comprehension of his whole teaching, that it cannot be omitted here. Unfortunately, every attempt to render this theory easily comprehensive in the same manner as the other parts of the work, that is to say by abbreviation and occasional modification of the terms of expression, has failed. In Capital, several hundred pages are devoted to this theory.1 Marx has here undertaken a detailed study of the proportions in which capital and labour must be distributed in the different branches of production, if the equilibrium between production and consumption is to remain undisturbed; and further, the demonstration that, with every increase of production--increase which is continuously necessitated by capital's need for accumulation--the capitalist system destroys the equilibrium, thereby causing the crises. Marx thus shows that crises are not caused by mistakes committed by the capitalists, but are, on the contrary, an

____________________
1
Cf. notably vol. II, ch. 18-21, 7-9, 13-17; vol. III, part 1, ch. 15; vol. III, part 2, ch. 30; in addition to which, observations are scattered throughout all three volumes.

-293-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Capital, the Communist Manifesto and Other Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 430

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.