Behavioral Research on Exceptional Children

By Samuel A. Kirk; Bluma B. Weiner | Go to book overview

3
The Trainable Mentally Retarded
Leon CharneyThe trainable mentally retarded are those children who are ineligible for classes for the educable mentally retarded, but who possess potentialities for training in self care, social adjustment in the home or neighborhood, and economic usefulness in the home or in a sheltered environment. On an individual psychometric examination such children usually fall in the 30 to 50 IQ range. At maturity they may attain a mental age range from approximately four to eight years.The material contained in this chapter is organized under the following topics:
1. Surveys and evaluations of school programs.
2. Physical and behavioral characteristics.
3. Learning.
4. Follow-up studies.
5. Family adjustment and parental counseling.

SURVEYS AND EVALUATIONS OF PUBLIC SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Connor Frances P., and Goldberg I. I. "Opinions of Some Teachers Regarding their Work with Trainable Children: Implications for Teacher Education". American Journal of Mental Deficiency, 1960, 64, 658-670.

Purpose: To provide information concerning the composition of

____________________
Reviewed by I. Ignacy Goldberg, Teachers College, Columbia University.

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Behavioral Research on Exceptional Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Authors v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Gifted 3
  • 2 - The Educable Mentally Retarded 54
  • 3 - The Trainable Mentally Retarded 90
  • 4 - The Visually Impaired 115
  • 5 - The Hard of Hearing 155
  • 6 - The Deaf 183
  • 7 - Children with Cerebral Dysfunction 226
  • 8 - Children with Orthopedic Handicaps and Special Health Problems 244
  • 9 - Children with Speech and Language Impairments 259
  • 10 - The Emotionally Disturbed 291
  • 11 - The Delinquent 318
  • 12 - Administration 357
  • Index of Names 365
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 372

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.