sturdy myrmidons by the nape of the neck, gallanted them to the gate of the fort, and dismissed them severally, with a kick on the crupper, as Charles the Twelfth dismissed the heavybottomed Russians, after the battle of Narva -- only taking care, to give two kicks to Van Curlet, as a signal mark of distinction.

A strong garrison was immediately established in the fort, consisting of twenty long-sided, hard-fisted Yankees, with Weathersfield onions stuck in their hats by way of cockades and feathers -- long rusty fowling-pieces for muskets -- hastypudding, dumb-fish, pork and molasses, for stores; and a huge pumpkin was hoisted on the end of a pole, as a standard -- liberty caps not having yet come into fashion.


CHAPTER III. CONTAINING THE FEARFUL WRATH OF WILLIAM THE TESTY, AND THE GREAT DOLOUR OF THE NEW-AMSTERDAMERS, BECAUSE OF THE AFFAIR OF FORT GOED HOOP -- AND, MOREOVER, HOW WILLIAM THE TESTY DID STRONGLY FORTIFY THE CITY -- TOGETHER WITH THE EXPLOITS OF STOFFEL BRINKERHOFF.

LANGUAGE cannot express the prodigious fury into which the testy Wilhelmus Kieft was thrown by this provoking intelligence. For three good hours the rage of the little man was too great for words, or rather the words were too great for him; and he was nearly choked by some dozen huge, misshapen, nine-cornered Dutch oaths, that crowded all at once into his gullet. Having blazed off the first broadside, he kept up a constant firing for three whole days -- anathematizing the Yankees, man, woman, and child, body and soul, for a set of dieven, schobbejaken, deugenieten, twist-zoekeren, loozenschalken, blaes-kaken, kakken-bedden, and a thousand other names, of which, unfortunately for posterity, history does not make mention. Finally, he swore that he would have nothing more to do with such a squatting, bundling, guessing, questioning, swapping, pumpkin-eating, molasses-daubing, shinglesplitting, cider-watering, horse-jockeymg, notion-peddling crew -- that they might stay at Fort Goed Hoop and rot, before he would dirty his hands by attempting to drive them away;

-143-

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