The Administration of Federal Grants to States

By V. O. Key Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

1. THE ROLE OF FEDERAL GRANTS-IN-AID

THE USE of the term "grant-in-aid" to describe payments by the federal government to assist the states in the conduct of specified governmental functions is somewhat misleading. "Grant-in-aid" connotes financial assistance in the performance of an established activity which requires expansion or reenforcement. In the United States the grant-in-aid has, in the main, been a mechanism to effectuate a national policy, or to promote the performance of a service on a nationwide scale. For reasons of administrative convenience and economy, or because of constitutional custom, Congress has deemed it expedient to utilize the existing state governmental machinery rather than to create new federal administrative mechanisms. A superficial description might picture the federal government as a philanthropic agency dispensing its bounty without much concern about the ultimate effect. But, in reality, Congress has deemed certain problems to be clothed with a national interest. It has determined with some precision what should be done, and how it should be done, and has provided money, machinery, and sanctions to insure the achievement of the national purpose.

In the discussion of the subject, this central purpose of federal-aid legislation has been obscured by confusion with collateral issues; therefore the thesis requires elaboration. In the adoption of most of the important federal-aid acts, the basic issues have been whether the activity was in the public interest, and whether it was a matter involving the national interest. The groups seeking legislation have attempted to persuade Congress that the proposed action would promote the national welfare. Furthermore, most of the activities federally aided have been relatively new governmental functions which had already been undertaken by only a few states. There has been a desire to extend them over the entire country, or to bring about a reorientation in the national interest. Although some of the aided activities could constitutionally have been undertaken by the federal government, it was thought more suitable to work through state governments. The purpose of the

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Administration of Federal Grants to States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 390

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.