Richard Crashaw: A Study in Style and Poetic Development

By Ruth C. Wallerstein | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The friends and colleagues to whom I am indebted for interest and for valuable stimulation in the course of the preparation of the book are more than those whose names can appear in this list of particular obligations. My friend Miss F. Louise Nardin read my first draft and had many invaluable suggestions to make. The members of the Committee on Publications of the English Department of the University of Wisconsin, Professors J. F. A. Pyre, William Ellery Leonard, and Julia Grace Wales, each read my book with great care, and each made important suggestions. I am most warmly grateful to them both for their interest and for their help. This is but one among numerous occasions recently on which I have turned to Professor Pyre, and on which he has shown unfailing generosity and interest. Professors Arthur Beatty and Helen C. White were also good enough to read the typescript. I am grateful to the keeper of the Printed Books of the British Museum and to the Keeper of Manuscripts of the Museum for permission to use their resources, and to Bodley's Librarian and to the Librarian of the Public Library of New York City, and especially to the Librarian of the Rare Book Room of that library for the same kind permission. Mr. Butterfield, then librarian of Peterhouse College in Cambridge, allowed me to consult books and manuscripts there in 1930. Mr. Walter Smith, our University Librarian, has been helpful in borrowing books for me. Miss Hester Meigs verified several citations for me in the Public Library of New York City. Mr. Mark Schorer has given me generous and most valuable aid in proofreading. Mrs. Paul Clark helped to make the index.

To the Regents of the University of Wisconsin, and through them to the State of Wisconsin, I most gratefully acknowledge my deep obligation for their generous provisions by which the final copy of my book has been typed and the book printed and published.

My earliest, deepest, and most continuous debt in all my study of literature I owe to one whom I cannot now thank. I have tried to express my sense of that among other uncounted obligations in my dedication.

RUTH WALLERSTEIN.

Madison, November 1933.

-7-

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Richard Crashaw: A Study in Style and Poetic Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • Chapter I- Introductory 9
  • Chapter II- Crashaw''s Life and Inner Growth 16
  • Chapter III- School-Work- The Latin Epigram and the Pattern of the Rhetorics 56
  • Chapter IV- The Translations 73
  • Chapter V- Emblem and Impresa- The Maturing of Crashaw''s Imagery 114
  • Chapter VI- Style and Spirit Fused 136
  • Bibliography 148
  • Index 159
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