Letters of Anne Thackeray Ritchie: With Forty-Two Additional Letters from Her Father, William Makepeace Thackeray

By Hester Ritchie | Go to book overview

To Emily Ritchie (in India)

March 8th, 1881.

. . . Think of my taking Billy1 yesterday to see little Tom Carlyle.2 The little Carlyle baby is very like his Great-uncle. He gave a grunt like him, and Billy opened his eyes and laughed and looked like his Grandfather for a moment. It was the oddest, most affecting moment to me. There were the two babies in the dear old room, and old me looking on at the new, like a shadow in the past. It was strange indeed, and I am sure you will sympathise.

. . . The armies of buds are out on every twig. The wind is east, the dust is dry, and yet there is a feeling of intense coming life. Everything out of doors looks so alive that it is quite strange to see no little green leaves and twigs bursting out on the furniture and wicker blinds.


Journal 1882

Early in the year Mrs. Darwin asked us to go and stay at Down, and so anxious was I to go, that I mistook the day, and went just a week before they asked us!

We drove to the door, the butler hospitably said, "Mr. and Mrs. Darwin are sure to wish you to remain pray don't go," and Mrs. and Mr. Darwin came out and called us in, and Mr. Darwin said, "You're as welcome as can be, and you must forgive me for laughing. I can't for the life of me help laughing."

There never was a more charming visit, nor a more delightful host and hostess. He told us about his travels with Admiral FitzRoy, he told us about birds, he told us about fishes, he told us about the tortoises in the Island of Ascension, hatched from the eggs in the sand and starting off and plunging into

____________________
1
Her son aged one year.
2
Grandson of Alexander Carlyle, a brother of Thomas Carlyle, who farmed at Craigenputtock when Carlyle and his wife lived there.

-183-

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Letters of Anne Thackeray Ritchie: With Forty-Two Additional Letters from Her Father, William Makepeace Thackeray
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • PRINCIPAL DATES IN THE LIFE OF ANNE THACKERAY RITCHIE x
  • I - 1837-1840 1
  • Isabella Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 4
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 4
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 5
  • Isabella Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 6
  • Isabella Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 8
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 9
  • II - 1840-1846 14
  • W. M. Thackeray to Anny aged3 14
  • W. M. Thackeray to Anny aged 7 15
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 16
  • III - 1846-1852 19
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 19
  • Notes on Family History 20
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 21
  • Major Carmichael-Smyth to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth (who was staying at 13, Young Street) 23
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 25
  • W. M. Thackeray to his sister-in-law Jane Shawe 27
  • W. M. Thackeray to his daughter Anny 29
  • W. M. Thackeray to his cousin Mrs. Irvine 30
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth March 15 [1852]. 34
  • W. M. Thackeray to Anny 39
  • IV - 1852-1854 43
  • Anny Thackeray aged fifteen to W. M. Thackeray in America 43
  • Anny Thackeray to George M. Smith 44
  • W. M. Thackeray to A. Fonblanque 46
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 52
  • V - 1854-1860 59
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael. Smyth 59
  • W. M. Thackeray to Army Thackeray 67
  • W. M. Thackeray to Miss Perry 67
  • Journal 1855. 68
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 70
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Frederick Elliot 76
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Frederick Elliot 79
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Frederick Elliot 84
  • Journal 1856 86
  • W. M. Thackeray to his Daughters 93
  • Journal 1856 94
  • To Anny Thackeray from Mrs. Dickens 97
  • W. M. Thackeray to his Daughters 98
  • W. M. Thackeray to his Daughters 99
  • Journal 1857 104
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 108
  • Anny Thackeray to her cousin Emmy Irvine 109
  • Journal 1859 111
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 112
  • VI - 1860-1863 115
  • W. M. Thackeray to Mrs. Carmichael-Smyth 116
  • Journal 118
  • VII - 1864-1867 121
  • Journal 1864 124
  • To George M. Smith 125
  • Journal 1866 129
  • VIII - 1867-1875 131
  • To George M. Smith 132
  • To George M. Smith 132
  • To her Sister 133
  • To her Sister 134
  • To Mrs. Tennyson 135
  • To J. F. Stephen (in India) 138
  • Journal 1870 141
  • Journal 1870 143
  • To. J. F. Stephen (in India) 144
  • To J. F. Stephen 147
  • To her Sister 147
  • To her Sister 148
  • To Richmond Ritchie 149
  • Journal 1873 151
  • To Richmond Ritchie 153
  • To Emily Ritchie 154
  • To Hallam Tennyson 155
  • To Richmond Ritchie 156
  • To Hallam Tennyson 157
  • To Margie and Annie Thackeray 158
  • To her Sister 161
  • To Richmond Ritchie 163
  • To Mrs. Douglas Freshfield 164
  • To Richmond Ritchie 167
  • IX - 1875-1877 170
  • To Mrs. Oliphant 170
  • To Richmond Ritchie 171
  • To Richmond Ritchie 172
  • To Richmond Ritchie 175
  • X - 1877-1894 177
  • To Andrew Hichexs 177
  • To Mrs. Tennyson 178
  • To her Husband 179
  • To Emily Ritchie (in India) 181
  • To Emily Ritchie (in India) 183
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie (in India) 185
  • To Mary Cholmondeley 186
  • To Rhoda Broughton 186
  • To George M. Smith 188
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie (in India) 188
  • To Mrs. Warre-Cornish 189
  • To her Husband 190
  • To George M. Smith 191
  • To Emily Ritchie 192
  • To Emily Ritchie 193
  • To her Husband 196
  • To her Husband 196
  • To Alfred, Lord Tennyson 198
  • To Mrs. Kemble 199
  • To Mrs. G. F. Watts 200
  • To Emily Ritchie 201
  • To Mrs. Kemble 202
  • To Gerald Ritchie (in India) 203
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie (in India) 204
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie (in India) 205
  • To Emily Ritchie 208
  • To Miss Browning 209
  • To G. F. Watts, R. A. 211
  • To Emily Ritchie (in Paris) 211
  • To Emily Ritchie (in Rome) 213
  • To Rhoda Broughton 213
  • To her Husband 214
  • To Mrs. Oliphant 215
  • To Miss Browning 217
  • To Mrs. Douglas Freshfield 218
  • To Emily Ritchie 219
  • To A. C. Swinburne 220
  • To Emily Lady Tennyson 222
  • To Mrs. Warre-Cornish 222
  • XI - 1894-1900 224
  • To Emily Ritchie 224
  • To Julian Sturgis 224
  • To Julian Sturgis 225
  • To Emily Ritchie 226
  • To her Husband 227
  • To Mrs. G. F. Watts 229
  • To Mary Millais 229
  • To Hallam Lord Tennyson 230
  • To her Son 231
  • To Emily Ritchie 236
  • To her Son 236
  • To Mrs. Warre-Cornish 237
  • To her Husband 238
  • To her Son 240
  • To Denny Oliphant 242
  • To A. C. Swinburne 243
  • To Reginald J. Smith 244
  • To her Son 245
  • To her Son 246
  • To her Husband 247
  • To Reginald J. Smith 248
  • To her Husband 249
  • To Mrs. Henry Hart 250
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie (in India) 251
  • XII - 1900-1912 254
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie (in India) 254
  • To Emily Ritchie 255
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie (in India) 256
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie (in India) 259
  • To Emily Ritchie 260
  • To her Daughter 261
  • To Emily Ritchie 261
  • To Mary Millais 262
  • To Mary Millais 267
  • To Mrs. Gerald Ritchie 268
  • To Mrs. W. W. Vaughan 269
  • To her Husband 270
  • To her Husband 272
  • To her Husband 273
  • To Lady Robert Cecil 276
  • To Emily Ritchie 276
  • To Anne Thackeray (in Rome) 277
  • To Emily Ritchie 278
  • XIII - 1912-1919 280
  • To Reginald J. Smith 280
  • To Lady Bell 282
  • To Mrs. George Prothero 282
  • To Mrs. George Prothero 283
  • To the Friends who gave the Portrait 284
  • To Miss Lee Schuyler, New York 285
  • To Mrs. George Prothero 287
  • To Rhoda Broughton 288
  • To Charles P. Johnson 290
  • To Miss Lee Schuyler, New York 291
  • To Edmund Candler (in Mesopotamia) 292
  • To Mrs. Charles Thackeray 294
  • To Thomas Hardy 296
  • To Jar grandson, James 297
  • To Mrs. Herbert Paul 298
  • To her grand-daughter, Maisie 298
  • To her Daughter-in-law 299
  • To Lucy Broadwood 301
  • To A. B. S. Tennyson 302
  • To her Daughter 303
  • CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF LADY RITCHIE'S BOOKS 306
  • Index 307
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