often specific in their choice of aquatic plants for food and shelter and an understanding of the ecology of such plants is of prime importance in order to carry out a natural program of conservation ( McAtee 1917).A word may be said concerning the intelligent use of lakes by resort owners. It has been shown that lakes are geologic features that evolve along definite trends. With this evolution goes definite floral and faunal development. It seems then that a lake should be studied and made to serve those ends for which it is best suited. A lake with very soft water, for instance, may never be a good fishing lake, since it lacks in food supply, and it would be a waste of effort to stock it. On the other hand it may become important to a different type of aquatic recreation. Lakes with abundant plant life may be undesirable as bathing and boating lakes, but they may become important to the fisherman by intelligent husbandry.
PROBLEMS REQUIRING INVESTIGATION
1. Relation of light, temperature, hardness, etc., to aquatic plant distribution. These environmental studies should be undertaken if possible with controlled conditions. When general rules are arrived at they should be compared with field results.
2. Relation of sedimentation to the rooted aquatic plant. The factors of sedimentation and plant succession are closely related as dynamic processes, and in each region, where lakes occur, there is need for careful observations. A fuller understanding of the sediments, their origin, structure, and effect upon the lake waters is needed before a great deal can be accomplished in plant succession. One of the most pertinent problems is a better understanding of the organic sediments.
3. Histological and Morphological studies. Much can be accomplished in the field of ecological anatomy and morphology that may explain the distribution and tolerances of aquatic plants. Those species of definite value to fish and game should have further studies made of their reproduction. Histological studies should be made in relation to the physiological experiments.
4. Critical taxonomic studies. Studies of this nature are important for every region where hydrophytes occur. There should be close correlation between these studies and ecological observations, for there are not only important taxonomic questions to solve, but the presence of certain species, varieties, and forms of rooted hydrophytes within lakes is often indicative of very specific conditions. Taxonomy will become one of the ecologist's most important tools, if use is made of the terms, species, varieties, and forms and there is an understanding of the environments in which they occur.
5. Productivity studies. The pursuit of productivity studies is important because they are closely related to the other fields of limnological investigation both scientific and applied.
6. Relation of aquatic plants to animals. Many phases present themselves for investigation when the relations of animal life to plants are considered and only a few can be suggested here:
a. The parallel succession of animals and plants.
b. Aquatic plants as food to specific animals.
c. The dispersal of aquatic plants by animals.
d. The role of aquatic plants in the morphology of the invertebrates.
e. Population studies of animals in certain plant communities.

REFERENCES CITED

BAKER F. C. 1918. The Productivity of Invertebrate Fish Food on the Bottom of Oneida Lake. Tech. Pub. No. 9, AT. Y. State Coll. Forestry.

BROWN W. H. 1911. The Plant Life of Ellis, Great, Little, and Long Lakes in North Carolina. Contrib. U. S. Nat. Herb., 13: 323.

FASSETT N. C. 1930. The Plants of Some Northeastern Wisconsin Lakes. Trans. Wis. Acad. Sci., 25: 157.

FROHNE W. C. 1938. Contribution to Knowledge of the Limnological Role of the Higher Aquatic Plants. Papers Mich. Acad. Sci.

GATES F. C. 1926. Plant Succession about Douglas Lake, Cheboygan County, Michigan. Bot. Gaz., 82: 170.

-121-

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