Men of Substance: A Study of the Thought of Two English Revolutionaries, Henry Parker and Henry Robinson

By W. K. Jordan | Go to book overview

IV
RELIGIOUS THOUGHT

1. HENRY PARKER

IT IS difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish between religious and political thought during the seventeenth century. In part this is true because the organic concept of the Christian society still filled the minds of men; in part, because the seventeenth century often argued in religious terms when it was actually concerned with political ends. It must ever be borne in mind that England, together with most of western Europe, for rather more than a century had found the task of accommodating the religious life and its institutions to the requirements of an altered economy, an enlarged national political organism, and a feverish intellectual renaissance to be an exciting, an absorbing, and an extremely dangerous matter. England was deeply stirred during this period by an intellectual conflict which a cool and sane government under Elizabeth alone prevented from flaming into internecine political conflict.

The Elizabethan settlement of religion was pragmatic, comprehensive, and, above all else, Erastian. Dominated by a lay intelligence which measured every trend in national life in strict relation to the ends of political unity and the reign of law, the whole weight of ecclesiastical policy was employed to restrain enthusiasm, to moderate the intemperance of zealots whose aspirations might rend the nation, and to destroy those elements in the religious life of the nation which ventured beyond carefully and strictly defined bounds of treason. Elizabeth, it is fair to say, alone amongst European sovereigns of her age, was successful in preventing eccentric or disaffected religious aspirations from fusing with scattered elements of political discontent. She realized, as did responsible opinion generally, that her starkly Erastian policy alone stood as the bulwark against the savage and destruc-

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Men of Substance: A Study of the Thought of Two English Revolutionaries, Henry Parker and Henry Robinson
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - Introduction 1
  • II - Henry Parker (1604-1652): Antecedents And Life 9
  • III - Henry Robinson (1605-1673?): Antecedents And Life 38
  • IV - Religious Thought 67
  • V - Political Thought 140
  • VI - Social and Economic Thought 203
  • Bibliography 259
  • Index 267
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.