The United States of America: A Study of the American Commonwealth, Its Natural Resources, People, Industries, Manufactures, Commerce, and Its Work in Literature, Science, Education, and Self-Government - Vol. 2

By Nathaniel Southgate Shaler | Go to book overview

CONTENTS. VOL. II.
CHAPTERPAGE
I.--PRODUCTIVE INDUSTRY1

Increasing population and its support. Science solving the food problem. War displaced by industry. Influence of steam and electricity. The industrial empire of North America. Removing obstacles to commerce. Population. National taxation. Imports and exports. Taxation and expenditures. Postal receipts. Production of cotton and iron. Railway mileage and freight service. Tonnage through St. Mary's Falls Canal. Progress in money wages. Purchasing power of daily wages. Agricultural implements. Comparative areas of States and Territories and the countries of Europe. Relative progress in population and wealth. Farm mortgages. Increasing products. The outlook.

EDWARD ATKINSON.

II.--TRANSPORTATION65

Theory and development. Railroads and water ways. Growth in capacity. Railroad statistics. Movement of persons. Railroad wars. Competition. Pools. Principles of rate-making. Unjust discrimination. Early regulation of railroad charges. State railroad commissioners. Work of the Interstate Commission. General view of the railroad problem. Perils of railroad service. The master car-builders' coupler. Country roads. Street railroads. Choice of motive power. Telegraphs, telephones, and the mail.

T. M. COOLEY and C. H. COOLEY.

III.--TYPICAL AMERICAN INVENTIONS134
Electricity: Prof. Henry's work. Morse and the telegraph. Electric motive power. The Bell telephone. The electric light. Edison's inventions. Electric traction. Communication with trains. Effects of electrical inventions. Dangers of electricity. A. E. KENNELLY.
Railroad construction and equipment: Freedom from State control. Characteristic grades and curves. Speed in laying tracks. Use of trestles. Development of the railroad bridge.

-iii-

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The United States of America: A Study of the American Commonwealth, Its Natural Resources, People, Industries, Manufactures, Commerce, and Its Work in Literature, Science, Education, and Self-Government - Vol. 2
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