The United States of America: A Study of the American Commonwealth, Its Natural Resources, People, Industries, Manufactures, Commerce, and Its Work in Literature, Science, Education, and Self-Government - Vol. 2

By Nathaniel Southgate Shaler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III.
TYPICAL AMERICAN INVENTIONS.

THERE is no more interesting or instructive chapter in the history of this country than that which concerns the development of the singular inventive power of our people. In all the other branches of thought and action we can trace this part of the intellectual work of our race for some centuries back in the progress of its civilization. The great increase in the readiness with which mechanical devices have been contrived is particularly characteristic of modern times. It is true that a certain measure of skill in dealing with natural powers is characteristic of the lowest savage, and it is one of the traits which strikingly separates man from the lower animals. It is even as true that all the stages of his advance from the lowest level of savagery have been to a great extent attended and accomplished by successive inventions; but this work went forward slowly until after the period of the middle ages. Even in the matter of weapons for use in war and in the chase--a class of objects which more than any other taxed the skill and ingenuity of early peoples--but little progress was made in the period from 4000 B. C. to the tenth century of our own era. Such inventions as clocks, printing, firearms, and other simple means whereby the interests of man were advanced by the use of natural powers, quickened the minds of people to the advantages which might be had through the exercise of the inventive habit. This stimulus, however, only operated in a slow manner, and the leaven had affected but few minds; and the accomplishments in the way of invention which had been attained at the time when the English colonies were planted in this country were inconsiderable in number. In the beginning of the seventeenth century there were probably not a dozen contrivances in common use among the people which would have seemed very novel to the educated people of Egypt two thousand years before the Christian era. At the present time every large city in the civilized world contains thousands of machines of more or less value to human society which were not dreamed of three hundred years ago.

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United States of America: A Study of the American Commonwealth, Its Natural Resources, People, Industries, Manufactures, Commerce, and Its Work in Literature, Science, Education, and Self-Government - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 654

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.