The United States of America: A Study of the American Commonwealth, Its Natural Resources, People, Industries, Manufactures, Commerce, and Its Work in Literature, Science, Education, and Self-Government - Vol. 2

By Nathaniel Southgate Shaler | Go to book overview

INDEX.
Agricultural implements, statistics of production, ii, 51.
Agriculture, more thorough tillage needed, i. 400-402; adapting methods to the country, 407-411; influence of American agriculture upon Europe, 413; future of exportable crops, 415; improved methods, ii, 8; fertilizers, 9; statistics of grain produced, 32; statistics of cotton produced, 33; the leading industry, 525; governed by peculiar conditions, 526; course of development, 617-619.
Alaska District, description, i, 182-186; gold mining, 361.
Alkaline soils, i, 393.
Allegheny, history and description, ii, 288.
American Steamship Company established, i, 564.
Animals, geological history, i, 438-441.
Architecture, English colonial practice, ii, 425-429; Spanish and French influences, 429-432; Greek forms, 434; the national Capitol, 435; the English-Gothic revival, 436; the Queen Anne revival, 438; work of Richard Upjohn, 438; societies and schools, 439; Western practice, 441; Romanesque forms, 447; influence of H. H. Richardson, 448-450; effect of the Columbian Exposition, 450; backward position, 632.
Areas of the States compared with those of other countries, ii, 52.
Arid region, i, 15-17, 391; nature of soil, 393; grasses available for. 412.
Arizona, silver mining, i, 363.
Arkansas District, geographic features, i, 135 soils, 135; climate, 136; timber, 136; vegetable products, 137; health, 137; Population, 138; minerals, 139-141.
Art, status in America, ii, 414-418; influence of the Centennial and Columbian Exhibitions, 418-422; an outline of development, 422-424.
Atlantic steamship lines, i, 597.
Baltimore, history and description, ii, 264- 266.
Black Ball Line of packets, i, 548.
Blizzards, i, 483.
Boston, history and description, ii, 262-264.
Brooklyn, history and description, ii, 258.
Buffalo, history and description, ii, 273-275.
California, history before 1848, i, 343-345; gold fever, 345-348; new industrial conditions, 349; growth of San Francisco, 351; public affairs. 352-354; agriculture, 365-367; fruit-growing, 367-370; irrigation, 370; manufactures, 373.
California District, geographic features, i, 168; climate, 169; vegetable products, 170; timber, 171; population, 172: minerals, 173; peculiar situation, 174.
Caribbean District, i, 186-189.
Cattle, herding on the plains, i, 411; grasses available for the and region, 412.
Cement output, i, 470.
Chicago, history and description, ii, 247- 251; Columbian Exposition, 251.
Cincinnati, history and description, ii, 269- 271.
Cities, general growth, ii, 214; drift toward, 215; government, 216; municipal system of Berlin, 217-222; municipal system of Glasgow , 223-227Paris, 227-230; government of St. Louis, 230-233; public vs. private control, 233-235; form of government in American cities, 235; statistics of

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