Identity and Ideology: Sociocultural Theories of Schooling

By Stanley William Rothstein | Go to book overview

7
Separating Theory from Practice: A Scholastic Question

Marx concerned himself with a concrete and observable problem: the "hiding" working men experienced when they sold their labor. The unequal relationship between workers and capitalists became the centerpiece of his mature work, the core from which all later abstractions followed. Marxist and sociocultural studies of schooling have moved away from these methods, preferring coherence-based, logical theories that separate ideas from classroom realities. Teachers struggle with themselves, their students, and the curriculum they teach. They may not recognize the symbolic violence inherent in their actions, but that does not mean they are incapable of such recognition. They may not see how their labor contributes to the consolidation of class interests and structures, but they could come to grasp these aspects of their work. Often, they may not be conscious of the way current practices oppress minority and poor children but, again, they are capable of such awareness. The failure of teachers to see what they are doing to students does not mean they are misrecognizing the situation, either. Rather they may be focusing on the social solidarity-producing aspects of their work, using these effects to condone or legitimize their impositional behaviors. These aspects of schooling are ideological, but no less real than other forms of ideas and communications. If we accept structural Marxist theories, we choose abstraction over everyday interactions in schools and society. Marx's manifesto now becomes absurd, as it then is addressed not to subjects who think and act, but to objects who are merely linguistic constructs. The struggle of minority children in American schools is considered too empirical, too affected by ideology to provide us with the theoretical insights. The internationalization of the labor market is also disconnected

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Identity and Ideology: Sociocultural Theories of Schooling
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Sociocultural Theories of Schooling: An Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Role of the State 19
  • 3 - Reproduction: Symbolic Violence in Educational Systems 45
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION 63
  • 4 - Ideological State Apparatuses 67
  • 5 - The Social Relations of Production 87
  • 6 - The Social Relations of Educational Production 109
  • 7 - Separating Theory from Practice: A Scholastic Question 129
  • Notes 151
  • Selected Bibliography 157
  • Index 159
  • About the Author 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 166

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.