Glenn Gould: The Performer in the Work: A Study in Performance Practice

By Kevin Bazzana | Go to book overview

10
Recording Technology

THE SUBJECT OF Gould's relationship to recording technology is a large and complex one, and has been discussed at length by Gould himself and others.1 Among classical performers, he was widely known by the 1960s as the greatest proponent of the electronic media--of studio recording, radio and television broadcasting, and film. He was, in Denis Dutton's words, 'the closest thing we have to a philosopher of music recording'.2 He was also a leading opponent of live performance, and of the music most appropriate to the concert hall. He felt that concert performance should no longer be the standard of musical behaviour in the late twentieth century. His views on the advantages of recording and the disadvantages of concert performance are well documented, and need not be rehearsed in detail. Relevant here are those aspects of recording technology that directly influenced his performance practices, for he used technology as a way of extending the range of interpretations available to him as a performer, to transcend the limitations of conventional piano performance.

Gould's interest in recording began in his youth, with private recordings on the relatively crude home equipment of the 1940s and 1950s, and grew with his early broadcasting for the CBC.3 In an internal CBC questionnaire from 1952, the 19- year-old Gould already made a strong statement in favour of recording and broadcasting and against live performance: 'the concentration on purely musical detail', which 'is of utmost importance for any performance', is 'much easier to achieve when there is no need to feel responsibility for the visual pleasure of the listener'.4 Despite his early interest in technology, his interpretations did not immediately show the influence of it, but there was a noticeable development in his appropriation of technology in those recordings made after his retirement from concert life in 1964. As he noted in a 1980 CBC radio broadcast, his early record-

____________________
1
See the following, passim: GGF; GGSL; "'What the Recording Process Means to Me'"; Burton, i; Davis; Eisenberg; Forfia; Kazdin; McClure; Monsaingeon, Chemins de la musique, i-ii; Théberge; and most of Gould published periodical interviews. See also GGR315-95; Cott, 81-103; Menuhin and Davis, 290-5; Payzant, GGMM21-50, 119-39; and Rivest, 4-44.
2
Dutton, 513.
3
Gould discusses his earliest radio work in GGR353-4; and March, 90-1.
4
'Glenn Gould's CBC Questionnaire from 1952', 5. In a 1974 self-interview, he spoke of the concert performer 'savor[ing] the ego gratification' of 'communicating with an audience from a power-base' ( GGR318).

-238-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Glenn Gould: The Performer in the Work: A Study in Performance Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vii
  • Contents xiii
  • CONTENTS OF CD xiv
  • LIST OF PLATES xv
  • Contents xvi
  • NOTES ON FORMAT xviii
  • Abbreviations xxii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - PREMISSES 9
  • 1 - Aesthetics and Repertoire 11
  • 2 - The Role of the Performer 36
  • 3 - Performance as Discourse 85
  • Part II - PRACTICES 129
  • 4 - Gould and the Piano 131
  • 5 - Counterpoint 142
  • 6 - Rhythm 160
  • 7 - Dynamics 204
  • 8 - Articulation and Phrasing 215
  • 9 - Ornamentation 228
  • 10 - Recording Technology 238
  • Conclusion 253
  • LIST OF GOULD PERFORMANCES CITED 269
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY. 277
  • Index 291
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.