Labor Market Politics and the Great War: The Department of Labor, the States, and the First U.S. Employment Service, 1907-1933

By William J. Breen | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1. The statistics are drawn from the Second Annual Report of the U.S. Employment Service (August 15, 1919), 66th Cong., 2d sess., H. Doc. 7734, 63:898-99.
2. See, for example, David M. Kennedy, Over Here: The First World War and American Society ( New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1980), 258-70; Valerie Jean Conner, The National War Labor Board: Stability, Social Justice, and the Voluntary State in World War I ( Chapel Hill: Univ. of North Carolina Press, 1983). If the war resulted in greater government intervention in the economy and accelerated trends toward centralization and consolidation, it was also true that the outcome often proved more ambiguous in practice than such a straightforward model of change suggests. For a detailed example of the ambiguity that could surround greater centralization and government intervention in World War I, see Robert D. Cuff, The War Industries Board: Business-Government Relations during World War I ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1973).
3. For a study of the effect of crisis on government growth, see Robert Higgs, Crisis and Leviathan: Critical episodes in the Growth of American Government ( New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1987); see also Julie Z. Strickland, War Making and State Building: The Dynamics of American Institutional Development, 1917-1935 (Ph.D. diss., Stanford University, 1988).
4. Stephen Skowronek, Building a New American State: The Expansion of National Administrative Capacities, 1877-1920 ( New York: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1982), 8.
5. Ellis W. Hawley, "Social Policy and the Liberal State in Twentieth-Century America," in Donald T. Critchlow and Ellis W. Hawley, eds., Federal Social Policy: The Historical Dimension ( University Park: Pennsylvania State Univ. Press, 1988), 120.
6. Hawley, "Social Policy and the Liberal State," esp. 119-25. See also Ellis W. Hawley, "The Discovery and Study of a 'Corporate Liberalism,'" Business History Review 52 (Autumn 1978): 309-20; Louis Galambos, "Technology, Political Economy, and Professionalization: Central Themes of the Organizational Synthesis," Business History Review 57 (Winter 1983): esp. 478-85; Donald T. Critchlow, The Brookings Institution, 1916-1952: Expertise and the Public Interest in a Democratic Society ( DeKalb: Northern Illinois Univ. Press,

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labor Market Politics and the Great War: The Department of Labor, the States, and the First U.S. Employment Service, 1907-1933
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.