The Etiquette of Race Relations in the South: A Study in Social Control

By Bertram Wilbur Doyle | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
ETIQUETTE IN FORMAL AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

RELATIONS between whites and blacks during the period of slavery were not, of course, confined to the more intimate situations that obtained on the plantations or in such primary groups as the church. There were occasions, for instance, where forms of address and reference were needed; instances where the races might come into contact in trains, theaters, or on the streets; in fact, as in the cities, wherever under contacts, light and perhaps superficial, distances needed. to be preserved, and status to be maintained.

There is evidence that slaves used "mistis" as a title for white women whom they had occasion to address at all in public places. 1 To white men of apparent upper-class ranking some military title, such as "captain" or "colonel" was generally used. "Boss" was the title used to address persons of lower rank than slaveholder but not so low as the "poor whites." It "Would be interesting to know how the slaves addressed this latter class; but the evidence is lacking that they addressed them at all. Perhaps, the slaves used "mister" and "madam" as the most formal terms of address. A letter from Port Royal tells of an insane slave woman, who, narrating stories from the Bible, referred to "Mr. Adam," and "Madam Eve." 2 No more formal relation could perhaps have been conceived by Negroes under the circumstances.

As terms of reference, "buckra" and "buckra man were used by the Sea Island slaves of South Carolina. In Manuel Pereira3 the term seems to refer to the nonslave-owning white man and does not carry the contempt and scorn implied in the term "Poor buckra." 4 On the other hand, the "buckra man" must

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Etiquette of Race Relations in the South: A Study in Social Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.