CHAPTER VII
APPLIED DISARMAMENT: NORMAL ARMAMENT

The Problem of Private Manufacture and Trade: Private Armament Industry and the League: The Non-Producing Country: Possible Solutions: The Weapons to be Limited: Production: The Magnitude of Producing Capacity: Peace Equipment: The Treaty of Versailles

The problems of applied disarmament in normal armament emerge in the answers to two questions. We have before us a range of items of armament, some true weapons, such as the machine- gun, and others, essential accessories or complementary units, such as the gun-carriage or sound-ranging devices. Further, for each such item we are faced with a development process, sometimes rooted in the peace activities of a nation and passing through various stages to reach maturity in bulk supplies of complete units for war. The two broad questions which relate to applied disarmament are as follows.

What actual articles, items, or weapons are to be subjected to conditions of limitation? It might be necessary to consider all weapons, but in practice it might be found that a chosen few were capable of exercising a critical or key function in disarmament. Secondly, having arrived at a proper choice of such items, then each one involves a process of development. What stages of this process must be subjected to control? Again, it may prove that the whole life of a weapon need not come under consideration, and that a check on certain critical stages, perhaps the last step of supply, might be effective. In attempting to answer these two questions, the main practical problems of normal disarmament will clarify.

Before proceeding to study these questions systematically, however, it is necessary to examine a special matter which cuts right across the rational consideration of disarmament, and which, if ignored, would confuse the whole issue. This is the private armament industry. The whole question of rational disarmament is based on an assumption which is so obvious and axiomatic that it is rarely stated. Nations cannot honour covenants which

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scientific Disarmament
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.