Style in Musical Art

By C. Hubert H. Bart Parry | Go to book overview

VI
FORM AND STYLE

IT may be as well to recognize in good time that style and form are nearly akin, and that they are not only liable to be confused, but that from some points of view their provinces seem to overlap. As has been said before, the test of style is the consistent adaptation of the materials of art or literature to the conditions of presentment; which is as much as to say that it is influenced by the nature of the material in which it is executed, the disposition and standard of intelligence of the audience or spectators to whom it is meant to appeal, and the circumstances or situations in which it is to be presented. But it must at once strike any one who gives thought to the matter that "form" is based on the same influences. The forms of works of art also vary with the qualities of the materials in which they are executed as much as their styles. If they are executed in iron or wood or stone, they must necessarily differ in form in accordance with the inherent properties of the materials. The form of a literary work is influenced by the purpose it is meant to serve. The form of a work which is meant to be presented on the stage is bound to differ from the form of a work which is meant to be read and lingered over in privacy and quiet seclusion; and

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Style in Musical Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I Forecast 1
  • Iii Simple Types of Instrumental Style 37
  • Iv Style in Music for the Domestic Keyed Instruments 53
  • V Elementary Complications of Style 72
  • Vi Form and Style 88
  • Vii Influence of Audiences on Style 106
  • Viii Influence of Audiences on Style 131
  • Ix National Influences on Style 152
  • X Texture I 173
  • Xi Texture 189
  • Xii Evolution of Thematic Material 209
  • Xiii Evolution of Thematic Material 228
  • Xiv the Sphere of Temperament 249
  • Xv Functions of Thematic Material 265
  • Xvi the Functions of Thematic Material II 289
  • Xvii Theory and Academicism 305
  • Xviii Antitheses 319
  • Xix Realistic Suggestion 335
  • Xx Quality I 373
  • Xxi Quality II 392
  • Appendix 429
  • Index 433
  • INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS 439
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