Style in Musical Art

By C. Hubert H. Bart Parry | Go to book overview

X
TEXTURE
I

IT does not require much strenuous thinking to realize the great possibilities of difference between inspiration and accomplishment, between the idea which the artist or musician wants to put into an artistic form and the execution of it. The world mainly concurs in attributing the inspiration to spiritual impulses, and the execution to the artistic skill, or musicianship, or mastery of artistic resource and method. And this mastery and musicianship are mainly manifested in what we may call for the nonce the texture of the work of art.

It surely is one of the inevitable feelings even of an ingenuous infant who endeavours to express himself in artistic fashion, that everything he puts into his work must have some meaning and purpose, what the expounder of art would call a function. Till the man outside art comes by and philosophizes it would not occur to the artist to fill up a puzzling corner of his picture with pointless paint, or to the composer to admit a lot of mere noises with no meaning at all into parts of a symphony he did not know what to do with. It would (until the children of

-173-

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Style in Musical Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I Forecast 1
  • Iii Simple Types of Instrumental Style 37
  • Iv Style in Music for the Domestic Keyed Instruments 53
  • V Elementary Complications of Style 72
  • Vi Form and Style 88
  • Vii Influence of Audiences on Style 106
  • Viii Influence of Audiences on Style 131
  • Ix National Influences on Style 152
  • X Texture I 173
  • Xi Texture 189
  • Xii Evolution of Thematic Material 209
  • Xiii Evolution of Thematic Material 228
  • Xiv the Sphere of Temperament 249
  • Xv Functions of Thematic Material 265
  • Xvi the Functions of Thematic Material II 289
  • Xvii Theory and Academicism 305
  • Xviii Antitheses 319
  • Xix Realistic Suggestion 335
  • Xx Quality I 373
  • Xxi Quality II 392
  • Appendix 429
  • Index 433
  • INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS 439
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