Style in Musical Art

By C. Hubert H. Bart Parry | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

I

In connection with page 97.

THE most widely diffused, and in many cases the most absurd, example of the transference of a special formula, from the conditions for which it was devised to others in which it is only intelligible by convention or by association, is that of the formula which may be described as the lefthand formula of dance music; of which the following may serve as a typical example:--

It was obviously devised originally for a keyed instrument; as the right hand being required to be entirely free to deal with the tune, the left hand has both to define the harmony and to emphasize the rhythm. The thump on the first beat of the bar serves at once to indicate the bass of the harmony and the strong beat of the rhythm, and the two chords which follow indicate the weak beats and supply the rest of the harmony. Realizing what is required to be done in the simplest and most unpretentious manner, the device may be acknowledged to be even remarkably ingenious. It has evidently effected what is wanted so satisfactorily that it has been accepted all the world over wherever the influences of what is called Western civilization prevail; and as it is not found in any musical system but that which has grown up in connection

-429-

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Style in Musical Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I Forecast 1
  • Iii Simple Types of Instrumental Style 37
  • Iv Style in Music for the Domestic Keyed Instruments 53
  • V Elementary Complications of Style 72
  • Vi Form and Style 88
  • Vii Influence of Audiences on Style 106
  • Viii Influence of Audiences on Style 131
  • Ix National Influences on Style 152
  • X Texture I 173
  • Xi Texture 189
  • Xii Evolution of Thematic Material 209
  • Xiii Evolution of Thematic Material 228
  • Xiv the Sphere of Temperament 249
  • Xv Functions of Thematic Material 265
  • Xvi the Functions of Thematic Material II 289
  • Xvii Theory and Academicism 305
  • Xviii Antitheses 319
  • Xix Realistic Suggestion 335
  • Xx Quality I 373
  • Xxi Quality II 392
  • Appendix 429
  • Index 433
  • INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS 439
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