Masterworks of Asian Literature in Comparative Perspective: A Guide for Teaching

By Barbara Stoler Miller | Go to book overview

Japanese Texts: Drama


THREE PLAYS OF THE NOH THEATER

Thomas Blenman Hare

The plays Izutsu, Atsumori, and Ataka are mainstays of the classic repertory of Noh with a consistent popularity and continuous performance tradition of five to six centuries. The first two were written by Zeami Motokiyo ( 1363-1443) and exemplify his ideas about the classic formal structure of Noh. They also display thematic characteristics that are common to many plays of the repertory, but rarely realized with such skill and grace. The third play, Ataka, was probably written by Zeami's grand-nephew, Kanze Kojiro Nobumitsu ( 1435-1516). It contrasts both formally and thematically with the other two and exemplifies a strain of Noh that has been equally popular in performance even though it has attracted less scholarly attention. All three works are performed a number of times each year, by both professionals and amateurs, on the Noh stages of contemporary Japan. Atsumori, in particular, has found an appreciative reading audience in the West as well, thanks to Arthur Waley's fine translation.

Noh attained a recognizable form as an independent performance art in the latter decades of the fourteenth century and was molded into what we have come to consider its "classic" formal structure early in the fifteenth. The individual whose name is most intimately associated with this accomplishment is Zeami, but other Noh masters, including his father, Kannami (or Kan'ami) Kiyotsugu ( 1333-1384), also played important roles in the early development of Noh.

Zeami was born into a provincial family of Noh performers just as Noh was beginning to attract the attention of rich patrons in the capital Kyoto. At the time, Kannami was the talented leader of a small provincial troupe whose performances relied on the main-

-501-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Masterworks of Asian Literature in Comparative Perspective: A Guide for Teaching
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 583

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.