Canada and the Canadian Question

By Goldwin D. C. L. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
FRUITS OF CONFEDERATION1

AMONG the ostensible objects of Confederation the most immediate perhaps were military strength and security against American aggression. Sceptics, among whom were two British officers,2 pointed out at the time that if the number of the militia would be increased by Confederation, the length of frontier to be defended would be much more increased, and that though a bundle of sticks might, as Federationists said, become stronger by union, the saying might not hold good with regard to a number of fishing-rods tied together by the ends. The Dominion since its extension to the Pacific has a frontier, for the most part perfectly open, of something like 4000 miles, while the garrison is broken into four sections, far beyond supporting distance of each other. The frontier of Manitoba and the North-West Territories, which for 800 miles is a political line, has to defend it the militia which can be furnished by a population of 150,000. In the

____________________
1
Books consulted: Collins Life and Times of Sir J. A. Macdonald," Stewart Canada under the Administration of Earl Dufferin," Collins Canada under the Administration of Lord Lorne," The Statistical Year Books of Canada, Morgan Dominion Annual Registers," and Mr. A. Blue's valuable issues of the Ontario Bureau of Industries and Statistics.
2
"Confederation of British North America", by E. C. Bolton and H. H. Webber , Royal Artillery. London, 1866.

-192-

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