Canada and the Canadian Question

By Goldwin D. C. L. Smith | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B
THE AGRICULTURE OF ONTARIO

By THOMAS SHAW, Professor of Agriculture and Arboriculture, Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Ontario.

THE climate of Ontario admits of the growing of as great a variety of produce as that of England, the natural capabilities of her soils are probably greater, and she is ahead of Great Britain in the introduction and use of agricultural implements of the most approved kinds.

The Province produces finer samples of various kinds of grain, a greater variety of the pure breeds of live stock, and a better quality of several of the most useful kinds of fruit, than any other province or state on the North American Continent. It is not, we fear, generally known that the people of this Province ship annually to Great Britain from one-third to one-fourth as many finished bullocks as the whole of the United States, and that we export annually to the latter country, in the face of a high tariff to the extent of many millions of dollars, the same kinds of agricultural products that are grown in that great Republic. In the hope of dispelling in some degree misconceptions and of disseminating the truth, the writer has consented to prepare this brief essay.

We do not claim for the Province the first place in the world for agricultural resources and development, but we do claim for it a foremost place. If the reader will but bear in mind that one hundred years ago nearly the whole of Ontario was primeval forest, and that seventy years ago the very spot on which these college walls now stand was the home of the wild beast, he will concur in the conclusion that the development of the agricultural resources of this country has been simply wonderful.


THE SOIL, CLIMATE, AND PRODUCTS OF ONTARIO

The climate of Ontario is very invigorating. In the summer it is rather warm, but the amount of bright sunshine, especially in the

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