Canada and the Canadian Question

By Goldwin D. C. L. Smith | Go to book overview

APPENDIX C
MINERAL RESOURCES OF CANADA

By T. D. LEDYARD, TORONTO

THE continent of North America is abundantly supplied with economic minerals which are distributed alike through the Dominion of Canada and the United States, and are confined by no international boundary. The British Provinces are as rich in mineral wealth as the neighbouring Republic, with a striking difference, however, in favour of the latter in the matter of development. The industrial situation of the world is changing; the supremacy in iron and steel manufactures hitherto held by Great Britain is about to be transferred to the continent of America. Reports of the late census show that the manufacture of pig-iron in the United States during the last ten years has been extraordinary, and at the present rate of increase that country is destined to become the leading producer of pig-iron in the world, possibly reaching this distinction very soon.

The quantity of pig-iron produced in the United States during the census year 1890 was 250,000 tons in excess of the production of Great Britain during the calendar year 1889, being 9 1/2 million tons as compared with 3 3/4 millions in 1880 and 2 millions in 1870.

Whereas England supplied in 1878 as much as 45 per cent of the world's production of pig-iron, as against 16 per cent supplied by the United States; in 1889 England only supplied 33 per cent, while the production of the United States had increased to over 30 per cent, and is rapidly growing.

While the production of iron ore in the Lake Superior districts was 5,000,000 tons in 1888 it grew to 7,000,000 in 1889, and in 1890 will exceed 8,000,000 tons.

The United States contain a population of about 65,000,000 and Canada is supposed to contain 6,000,000, so that to be even in the race the Dominion should show one tenth as much as the production

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