The Life and Works of Vittorio Carpaccio

By Pompeo Molmenti; Gustav Ludwig et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI THE OTHER WORKS OF VITTORE CARPACCIO AND OF HIS SON BENEDETTO

LET us now examine such isolated paintings by Carpaccio as have come down to our times. Modern criticism has rendered unnecessary the task of pointing out the erroneous assignation of not a few of the paintings which in old Catalogues of Galleries, public and private, have passed under his name. We would only observe that in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli in Milan there is a painting 1 m. 22 cm. wide x 76 cm. high, remarkable for the originality of its composition and bearing the spurious signature Victor Carpathius, which, according to Giovanni Morelli, ought instead to be attributed to Michele da Verona, an artist who flourished between the years 1500 and 1523.1 The painting represents Delilah directing a youth hidden amid the folds of her robe how to cut the locks of the sleeping Samson. The three figures are clad in fashionable fifteenth- century costume and the scene is enacted on a terrace with a background of landscape and towers.

The ancient church of Noale, a hamlet in Venetia, contains in the sacristy an altar-panel representing S. John the Baptist with SS. Peter and Paul on either side. This has always been assigned to Carpaccio, and Crico in his Lettere su le Belle Arti Trivigiane2 gives an enthusiastic description of the painting. But our Vittore certainly was not its author, and everything points, as Cavalcaselle observes, rather to the workmanship of Vettor Belliniano.

In the choir of the Cathedral of Serravalle (Vittorio), beside the altarpiece painted in 1547 by Titian, opened two canvas doors of the old organ with S. Andrew accompanied by SS. Agatha, Peter, and Catherine on one wing and The Annunciation on the other;

____________________
1
Zannandreis, Le Vite dei pitt., scult. e arch. veronesi, pp. 99 e seg. Verona, 1891. -- Michele da Verona's most important work is The Crucifixion (3 m. 36 cm. x 7 m. 16 cm.), which passed from the convent of S. Giorgio at Verona into the Brera Gallery.
2
Venice, 1803.

-193-

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