The Deaf Child in the Family and at School: Essays in Honor of Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans

By Patricia Elizabeth Spencer; Carol J. Erting et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction to the Book

Researchers studying the growth of deaf1 children have made significant and impressive strides since the mid-1970s. Indeed, attitudes have evolved from a time when deaf children were seen essentially as broken hearing children to a time when there is an understanding and appreciation of both their special qualities and the many characteristics they share with hearing children. Researchers now are able to provide teachers, lawmakers, and other professionals with sound advice concerning the needs and challenges of deaf children and their families, and to contribute to optimizing their educational and personal growth. This progress notwithstanding, it is rare that basic research and application, family and school, are considered in a single venue.

This volume brings together chapters from an international group of researchers, educators, and clinicians, whose work focuses on the development of deaf and hard of hearing children and adolescents. The ideas presented here have been influenced in various ways by the groundbreaking work of Kathryn P Meadow-Orlans, who, with her colleague Hilde Schlesinger, promoted the application of developmental theories and approaches to the study of deaf and hard of hearing children ( Schlesinger & Meadow, 1972).

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1
Variation will be noted throughout this book on the capitalization of the first letter of the word "deaf." Beginning the word with a capital letter is a convention typically used to signify persons who participate in and identify with a specific Deaf cultural group. In contrast, uncapitalized use of the word deaf tends to be used more inclusively and more often describes persons based on audiological status instead of participation in a cultural group. Because interpretation and use of these conventions is not universal, capitalization usage differs across chapters.

-xvii-

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