VI
*AESTHETICS AS A PHILOSOPHIC DISCIPLINE*

INTRODUCTION

Philosophy is as much subject to fashion, current events, public movements, and charismatic personalities, as is any other social phenomenon. Were this anthology edited in the 1920's, 1930's, or 1940's, the predominantly fashionable elements for consideration in aesthetics as a philosophic discipline would surely have been Marxian thought, the philosophies of John Dewey, Henri Bergson, and Benedetto Croce. Today, it is the existentialism of Jean-Paul Sartre and the ontology of Martin Heidegger.

There is nothing saddening in this fact. Fashions come and go, for the obvious reason that a new formulation possesses the vast importance of engaging contemporary interest. It has what appeals to its immediate audience as assimilating the most recent experiences common to that audience, and offering the most encompassing solutions, or at least formulating questions in the style most appropriate for grasping widespread attention. This is not to say that Bergson or Dewey is no longer of interest to aesthetics, or that enough study of Croce has proved that his position leads up a blind alley. But such studies do not represent "Aesthetics Today" in the sense that they no longer stand as guides to unexplored territory, as Sartre and Heidegger are felt to do today. It is the belief that they indicate areas which promise undiscovered treasures of understanding which gives the sense of adventure to current philosophic thought.

" The Literature of Extreme Situation s" is Robert Cumming's analysis of an aesthetics possible to the existentialism of Sartre. In effect, it is a brilliant comparison of Kierkegaard and Sartre with respect to the nature and functions of literature and philosophy. Both of these writers have used fiction as well as discursive essays for the exposition of their thought. While they share a common concern with questions of the relationship between reflection and action, the difference in their interpretations is expressed in the different uses they make of imaginative literature. It is the role of literature that is crucial to any future aesthetics compatible with existentialism, and Professor Cumming's analysis is the best general introduction to this subject.

Heidegger's interest is, unquestionably, not so much in

-375-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aesthetics Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.