French Politics and Algeria: The Process of Policy Formation, 1954-1962

By William G. Andrews | Go to book overview

9
Conclusion

THE MEMBERS of a democratic political society tend to have a common interest regarding an external problem and diverse interests regarding an internal issue. The external interest, being one, is best defended through a single voice. The executive branch of government is the organ best equipped to speak with such a voice because it generally has unity of command and direction. It has unity because its distinctive function is administrative and efficient administration requires the clear-cut lines of authority and focus of responsibility that only such unity can provide.

The particular interests within a community, being diverse, are most easily reconciled within an organ in which a variety of points of view are expressed. Those interests can be reconciled only when they have been identified, and they can be identified only when they have been articulated. The adjustments are most likely to be accepted by the interested members of the community if they are confident that their points of view have been presented by valid spokesmen and if there has been serious public deliberation of the issue. The branch of government best suited to perform this function is a representative, deliberative assembly. This, of course, does not exclude initiation of internal policy by the executive. It does mean that internal policy, from whatever source, is most likely to reconcile most satisfactorily conflicting interests when framed with a view toward its acceptability by a genuinely representative and deliberative legislature and when subject to amendment by such a body.

In a country such as twentieth century Britain, which has a

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
French Politics and Algeria: The Process of Policy Formation, 1954-1962
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • I - The Context of the Problem 1
  • 2 - Public Opinion and the Press 16
  • 3 - Parties and Interest Groups 32
  • 4 - Elections and Referenda 46
  • 5 - The Political Executive: The Fourth Republic 67
  • 6 - The Political Executive: The Fifth Republic 92
  • 7 - The Legislature: The National Assembly Of the Fourth Republic 135
  • 8 - The Legislature: The National Assembly Of the Fifth Republic 164
  • 9 - Conclusion 180
  • Epilogue 189
  • Chronology 205
  • Glossary and Abbreviations 209
  • Index 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.