Education of the Intellectually Gifted

By Milton J. Gold | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
Creativity as an Aspect of Giftedness

Out of the meaningless practical shapes of all that is living or lifeless

Joined with the artist's eye, new life, new form, new colour.

-- T. S. Eliot

Avid to learn, receptive to the environment, stimulating to his teachers, the bright child constantly tempts parents and educators to try to make him over in their own image. Here is the learner apt for absorption of the cultural heritage, its graces as well as its substance. Here is the student who can and who will "work hard," "apply" himself, "buckle down," and "meet standards." For him the extra subject, the accelerated program, the longer assignment, the polished skill seem appropriate, for he is the child who will and who can respond.

The appropriateness of such procedures, however, has to be measured against the aims of our culture and its schools. Academic achievement in the realm of the customary disciplines is certainly valuable, but there are some who would question this goal as the only value to be sought. Gardner Murphy, in his provocative volume, Human Potentialities ( 1958), raises serious objection. He has little doubt of the ability of gifted youngsters to absorb the heritage. This, he says, is not the need of our times when civilization walks a tightrope between catastrophe and glory. We have a pressing need "to see in perspective where the major areas for fresh creations exist; in particular to discover those areas in which curiosity about the social order, eagerness to understand man's

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Education of the Intellectually Gifted
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Release of Human Potential 1
  • 2 - Characteristics of Gifted Children 25
  • 3 - Intelligence and Intelligence Testing 50
  • 4 - Identification of Exceptional Ability 76
  • 5 - Creativity as an Aspect of Giftedness 101
  • 6 - Planning Programs for Gifted Students 135
  • 7 - Patterns in Education of the Gifted 151
  • 8 - Thinking 184
  • 9 - Language Arts for the Gifted Student 207
  • 10 - Social Studies and Social Education 237
  • 11 - Science and Mathematics for the Gifted 254
  • 12 - The Fine Arts 284
  • 13 - Ability Grouping 299
  • 14 - Acceleration 328
  • 15 - Guidance 352
  • 16 - Motivation and Underachievement 381
  • 17 - Teachers for Gifted Children 412
  • 18 - Research: Endeavors and Opportunities 428
  • Bibliography 446
  • Index 466
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 472

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.