Education of the Intellectually Gifted

By Milton J. Gold | Go to book overview

Chapter 14
Acceleration

The lamp of genius burns quicker than the lamp of life.

-- Schiller

No paradox is more striking in the education of the gifted than the inconsistency between research findings on acceleration and the failure of our society to reduce the time spent by superior students in formal education. More evidence will be found favoring acceleration than homogeneous grouping or particular enrichment devices; yet acceleration is the least practiced instrument in educating the gifted. Apparently those values which favor a standard period of dependency and formal education for young people in our culture are stronger than demands for early achievement because of social need. These values seem stronger, too, than the individual's desires for early independence or his drive to create.

The years spent in school, of course, are not determined by school authorities. School boards work within confines established by the economy and by attitudes toward educating the young which reflect the nation's economic needs. In the United States for at least two generations our society has been able to forego the productive efforts of adolescents and of approximately one-fourth of young adults of college age. Our traditions of equal opportunity and of individual betterment through education have influenced public and private decisions to keep young people who can be spared in school. Not only have they been permitted to attend school, school attendance laws have steadily pushed upward the age at which they have been required to go to school. Moreover, public and

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Education of the Intellectually Gifted
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Release of Human Potential 1
  • 2 - Characteristics of Gifted Children 25
  • 3 - Intelligence and Intelligence Testing 50
  • 4 - Identification of Exceptional Ability 76
  • 5 - Creativity as an Aspect of Giftedness 101
  • 6 - Planning Programs for Gifted Students 135
  • 7 - Patterns in Education of the Gifted 151
  • 8 - Thinking 184
  • 9 - Language Arts for the Gifted Student 207
  • 10 - Social Studies and Social Education 237
  • 11 - Science and Mathematics for the Gifted 254
  • 12 - The Fine Arts 284
  • 13 - Ability Grouping 299
  • 14 - Acceleration 328
  • 15 - Guidance 352
  • 16 - Motivation and Underachievement 381
  • 17 - Teachers for Gifted Children 412
  • 18 - Research: Endeavors and Opportunities 428
  • Bibliography 446
  • Index 466
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